Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Mortgage Rates in Drift Mode
Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:00:02 GMT - Mortgage rates didn't do much today. The average lender was effectively unchanged from yesterday. The same could be said yesterday, and the day before that, and so on and so on... The only major adjustment to rates in recent weeks has been the abrupt spike of roughly 0.15% that occurred for some lenders when they re-implemented the new adverse market fee. Not sure what that is? Get caught up HERE . The adverse fee will continue working its way through the industry in the coming weeks. No lender is immune. This presents a great opportunity to lock refinance loans if you have one in process with a lender who has yet to bring the fee back. Once the fee is back in play for every lender, we could see rates relax just a little--at least enough to notice. The rationale is that there's currently a
Refresher on The New Refi Fee and Its Effect on Mortgage Rates
Tue, 22 Sep 2020 21:41:29 GMT - Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are the two government sponsored agencies that guarantee timely payment of principal and interest to the investors who front the money that finances the American mortgage market. This guarantee means that more investors are willing to participate and at more advantageous rates for homeowners. Naturally, not every mortgage is repaid perfectly. Sometimes, payments are missed. In more serious situations, loans can end in foreclosure, short sales, etc. In those cases, the housing agencies are there to act as a backstop ensuring investors are made whole. In order to foot that bill, Fannie and Freddie collect fees on loans that they guarantee. Shockingly, these are called guarantee fees (or guaranty fees" with a "Y" in the case of Fannie Mae). The mortgage industry and
Mortgage Rates Vary Widely--Nothing To Do With The Fed
Thu, 17 Sep 2020 21:15:17 GMT - Yesterday's policy announcement from the Federal Reserve had a chance to cause significant volatility for the bond market and the bond market is the chief ingredient in the mortgage rate equation. But this time around, the Fed didn't cause a measurable reaction in the mortgage market. I'm frequently asked whether mortgage rates are 0% since the Fed just kept rates at 0%. People hear a headline on the news or a radio soundbyte mentioning the words "Fed, rate, zero," and then assume the Fed just made some change that dropped rates to zero percent. After all why would there be so many news headlines about it if the Fed merely kept its policy rate unchanged?! It's a fair question in that sense, but understand that the Fed's rate decision will always make the news, even if the rate is the same as
Why Use a Mortgage Broker?

Why Use a Mortgage Broker?

When shopping for the best mortgage or the best mortgage rate, many home buyers enlist the services of a mortgage broker to find them the best terms and rates. Since the real estate market crash in 2008, however, the business practices of brokers have come under scrutiny and the question of whether they are acting in the customers' best interests has been raised. Working with an experienced, competent mortgage broker can help you find the right mortgage, but there are both advantages and disadvantages that you should consider before committing to one. 


Advantages:


Saves You the Legwork
Mortgage brokers have regular contact with a wide variety of lenders, some of whom you may not even know about. The alternative to working with a broker is to call up dozens of lenders and compare their mortgage terms and rates on your own. A broker saves you the time and headache of having to do that. A broker also can steer you away from certain lenders with onerous payment terms buried in their mortgage contracts to help you find a better mortgage. 

Brokers May Have More Access 
Some lenders work exclusively with mortgage brokers and rely on them to be the gatekeepers to bring them suitable clients. You may not be able to call some lenders up directly to get a retail mortgage. Brokers may also be able to get special rates from lenders due to the volume of business generated that might be lower than you can get on your own. 

You May Save Some Fees 
There are several different types of fees that can be involved in taking on a new mortgage or working with a new lender, including origination fees, application fees, and appraisal fees. In some cases, mortgage brokers may be able to get lenders to waive some or all of these fees which can save you hundreds to thousands of dollars. 

Disadvantages:


Brokers' Interests May Not Align with Your Own
Your ultimate goal in shopping for a mortgage is to find one with an affordable interest rate and low fees. You are in it for the long haul. A mortgage broker, on the other hand, often gets paid a fee from the lender for bringing in the business. This fee can be based on the amount of the mortgage, and will vary amongst lenders. A broker's goal, therefore, is to get you into a mortgage that maximizes their compensation. The 2008 market crash revealed that many brokers were getting their clients into mortgages that they could not afford over time.

You May Not Be Getting the Best Deal
Many homebuyers simply assume that a broker can deliver a better mortgage than they could get on their own, but this is not always the case. Some lenders may offer homebuyers the exact same terms and rates that they offer mortgage brokers (sometimes, even better). It never hurts to shop around on your own to see if your broker is really offering you a great deal.

Brokers Often Do Not Guarantee Estimates 
When a mortgage broker first presents you with offers from lenders, they often use the term "good faith estimate." This means that the broker believes that the offer will embody the final terms of the deal, but this is not always the case. In some cases, the lender may change the terms based on your actual application and you may end up paying a higher rate or additional fees.

Some Lenders Do Not Work with Mortgage Brokers at All 
This is an increasing trend since 2008, as some lenders are finding that broker-originated mortgages were more likely to go into default than direct lending. By working through a broker, you may not have access to these lenders, some of whom may be able to offer you better mortgage terms than you can get through the broker. 

The Bottom Line
Mortgage brokers may be able to find you the loan of your dreams, but you should weigh the potential downsides before hiring one. We always suggest that you begin your search at I Want a Better Mortgage (iWantaBetterMortgage.Com).  Spend some time contacting lenders directly to obtain an understanding of what mortgages may be available to you. Work with a reliable mortgage broker with solid references and ask them to guarantee their loan estimates.

 

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