Mortgage Rate Watch

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/consumer_rates/

Mortgage Rates Move Up From Long-Term Lows
Wed, 04 Aug 2021 20:20:00 GMT -

Mortgage rates hit their best levels in 6 months yesterday, but moved higher today following a strong report on the services sector.  

The economy is one of the key inputs for interest rates.  As such, several of the most relevant economic reports have a longstanding history of causing day-to-day volatility.  Today's ISM Non-Manufacturing Index is one of a handful of the most important reports.  By coming out much stronger than expected, it suggested the economy was closer to a level that would prompt the Fed to make changes to rate-friendly policies.  Bonds reacted with lower prices and higher yields (aka "rates"). 

Of course we're only talking about only one economic report.  A few short hours earlier, another important report, ADP Employment, missed by a longshot.  A few days ago, ISM's own manufacturing index suggested the post-covid economic growth was leveling off.  

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Mortgage Rates Drift Down to New 6-Month Lows
Tue, 03 Aug 2021 18:48:00 GMT -

Mortgage rates moved slightly lower again today--extending a steady string of improvements that began after last week's Fed announcement.  The average lender is now able to quote conventional 30yr fixed rates that are at least as low as those seen in the middle of July.  In most cases, today's offerings are slightly better.

The details can vary quite a bit depending on the scenario (purchase/refi, credit, downpayment, etc), but best-case scenarios have been back in the "high 2's" for weeks.  In almost all cases, today's rates are the lowest since the beginning of February.

What's up with the refreshingly strong move back toward all-time lows?  

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Mortgage Rates Near Long-Term Lows Despite Taper Talk
Thu, 29 Jul 2021 18:50:00 GMT -

"Taper talk" refers to comments, speeches, or official policy communications from the Federal Reserve (aka "the Fed") that speak to the timing and nature of a reduction in the Fed's bond buying activities.  Wow!  What a boring and potentially confusing sentence!  Let's try again...

The Fed buys bonds--US Treasuries and mortgage backed bonds (which, in turn, serve as the foundation for mortgage rate pricing).  This helps rates move or remain low.  When markets think the Fed is going to stop buying bonds, rates are at risk of moving higher. 

The current bond buying efforts began as a response to the pandemic.  They helped stabilize the financial system and they provided "accommodation" (a boost to overall economic activity intended to support the Fed's goals on inflation and job growth).  As the pandemic grew more manageable and especially as the economy has come back online, the Fed has increasingly discussed winding down (or "tapering") the bond buying programs.  

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Buying an Investment Property

Buying an Investment Property

Don't Buy Your First Investment Property Until You Read This

Are you thinking of buying a rental property as part of your investment strategy? Here are a few things you need to think about.

Real estate can be an excellent part of anyone's investment strategy. However, before you buy your first house, condo, duplex, or apartment building to rent out, you need to have a good idea of what you're getting into.

Here are three things to be aware of before jumping into real estate investing -- and an alternative investment you could use instead.

The income can be inconsistent
When you buy just one investment property, you are effectively putting all of your eggs in one basket, just as if your entire portfolio consisted of stock in one company.

While owning an investment property can certainly be lucrative, it leaves you vulnerable to certain risks.

For example, if you buy a $100,000 investment property, you should be able to earn $1,000 in rental income per month, based on the general rule that properties should rent for about 1% of their value. However, what if you need several months to find your first tenant? Or what if your tenants stop paying rent and you have to evict them (which could take quite a while)?

If such a situation occurs, not only will your investment produce no cash flow, but you're still stuck paying for things like the mortgage, property taxes, insurance, and maintenance.

Do you really want to deal with tenants and maintenance?
The first mistake I made when I bought a rental property was underestimating how much work can be involved in dealing with tenants.

Finding quality tenants can be a challenge in itself, but the real issues tend to come up after they move in. For example, if your tenant is late on rent, do you really want to chase people down to find out what's going on? Do you have the first clue of what to do if you need to evict a tenant? And what if they are making too much noise, letting other people live there, or are violating any other part of the rental agreement?

Don't forget about maintenance and repairs. If you manage your rental property, be prepared for the phone to ring in the middle of the night if the tenants have a plumbing issue.

If you don't want to handle these situations, the alternative is to hire a property manager. This should cost you about 10% of the rental income you bring in. This can be well worth it, but it will cause your profits to take a serious hit.

Make sure that you account for "all" the costs
Speaking of the cost of a property manager, you might be surprised at how much it really costs to own a rental property.

In the example cited earlier involving a $100,000 rental property, let's say you put 20% down on the house and collect $1,000 in monthly rent. By financing the other $80,000, you can expect your monthly mortgage payments to be about $392 at today's rates, which might sound like an incredible profit margin. However, when figuring out the cash flow of your investment property, make sure to account for property taxes, insurance, maintenance costs, and property management.

These costs will vary based on your location and the condition of the property, but could easily add $500 or more to your monthly expenses. Also, bear in mind that many jurisdictions charge much higher property tax rates on investment properties, so make sure you take this into account as well.

Know what you're getting into
I'm not trying to talk you out of buying an investment property. In fact, if you do it right, buying an investment property can produce cash flow and build equity, creating wealth over time without a huge initial investment.

However, just like with any other investment, you need to make sure you know exactly what you're getting into and prepare for all the costs and the risks involved. If these seem like too much trouble, there is no shame in looking into alternatives, such as real estate investment trusts.

Buying an investment property can be a great opportunity.

Whether it be a house, cottage, farm, condo, or plot of land, buying real estate is traditionally a sound and profitable investment, offering both rental income and capital gains. The most obvious advantage of buying any income property is having other people pay off the debt on your investment property. And with interest rates low, there's no time like the present to jump in.

To buy an investment property you will need sound financing information and flexible loan options. When choosing a lender, loan rates are not always the most important. Because investment property mortgages are subject to specific governmental requirements, mortgages are constantly changing. It's a good idea to consult with a mortgage specialist at i Want a Better Mortgage who can bring experience and training to the table, helping you make an informed decision about your investment property mortgage options.

 

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