Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Huge Housing Rebound, All-Time Low Rates, But At What Cost?
Thu, 02 Jul 2020 19:29:39 GMT - This week's economic data included the biggest-ever gain in Pending Home Sales, a leading indicator for the housing market. Meanwhile, mortgage rates pushed down to new all-time lows yet again. But at what cost? The most pessimistic way to explain the surge in home sales is to say it was only made possible by the record-setting declines in the past few months. That's mostly true, but it fails to give credit to what the industry and government officials have been doing to help jump start economic activity. Would sales bounce back like this without all-time low mortgage rates and a stock market recovery (both made possible by emergency intervention from the Federal Reserve)? Would consumers be as comfortable spending money without the promise of additional fiscal stimulus and other support programs
Rates at All-Time Lows Ahead of Important Jobs Data
Wed, 01 Jul 2020 21:04:04 GMT - Mortgage rates were generally unchanged today, thus leaving the average lender at all-time lows for conventional 30yr fixed scenarios. It continues to be the case that loan scenarios with additional risk factors have NOT seen nearly as much improvement as those in the top tier. In general, however, things are starting to improve. When coronavirus rocked the financial markets in March, mortgage rates were particularly hard hit. This had a lot to do with the anticipated inability of millions of homeowners to make their mortgage payments. While the government and the mortgage industry rushed to put programs in place to help those homeowners, there were/are unavoidable consequences for mortgages in the eyes of investors. Simply put, each additional risk factor that makes forbearance (a temporary
Personal Debt Consolidation

Personal Debt Consolidation

The combining of several unsecured debts into a single, new loan that is more favorable. Debt consolidation involves taking out a new loan to pay off a number of other debts. The new loan may result in a lower interest rate, lower monthly payment or both. Consumers can use debt consolidation as a tool to make it easier to get out of student loan debt, credit card debt and other types of debt that aren't tied to an asset.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debt Consolidation'

There are several pitfalls consumers should consider when consolidating debt:

– Extending the loan term. Your monthly payment and interest rate might be lower, but you might pay more interest in the long run if you take longer to pay back what you owe.

– Continuing to spend beyond your means. Consolidating debt alone does not get you out of debt; improving spending and saving habits is key. Put your old credit cards in a drawer so you won't use them and don't apply for new ones to avoid getting back into debt.

– Using a home equity loan or line of credit to consolidate consumer debt. While these loans offer low interest rates and deductible interest for taxpayers who itemize their deductions, they also put your home at risk if you fail to make the required payments. Be very cautious about taking this route. It doesn't make sense to lose your house because you couldn't pay your credit card bills.

– Paying expensive fees to a debt-consolidation service. You can consolidate your debt yourself for free with a new loan or low-interest credit card.

– Consolidating debt for convenience. The simplicity of a single monthly payment is not a sufficient reason to consolidate debt.

DEFINITION of 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A loan that combines two or more federal education loans into a single loan. A Direct Consolidation Loan allows the borrower to make a single monthly payment. The loan is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Education and does not require borrowers to pay an application fee.

BREAKING DOWN 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A Direct Consolidation Loan allows borrowers to lower the number of loan payments they have to make each month, combining them into a single payment. Most federal loans are eligible for consolidation, but private loans are not eligible. Borrowers can consolidate once they complete school, leave school or fall below half-time student status.

Before considering a Direct Consolidation Loan, it is important to consider any benefits associated with the original loans, such as interest rate discounts and rebates. Once the loans are rolled into a new loan, those benefits are lost. Additionally, if the new loan increases the repayment period, the borrower may wind up paying more interest.

 

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