Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Rates Reacted to Jobs Report, But Not Like You'd Expect
Fri, 07 May 2021 23:59:37 GMT - Once a month, the government releases the Employment Situation, also known as "the jobs report." No other piece of economic data is as consistently relevant for the bond market and, thus, interest rates. For most of the past year, the normal correlation between jobs and rates was on hold. That makes sense, of course. Initial lockdowns completely obliterated the labor market and we've been waiting to see how it would recover and how it would be reshaped ever since. In the past 1-2 months, the bond market has finally shown some willingness to react to economic reports. Notably, last month's exceptionally strong jobs numbers put obvious upward pressure on rates. Because of that, anticipation was high for this week's report. Indeed, there was a very big reaction . Economists were expecting the
Mortgage Rates Are Low and Stable, But Face Bigger Risks Tomorrow
Thu, 06 May 2021 20:35:53 GMT - Mortgage rates moved lower today, bringing the average lender to the best levels since late February. Despite the milestone, the day-over-day movement in rates has been pretty mild. Most lenders are making changes that are only noticeable in the form of upfront costs (aka "points") as opposed to rates themselves. If we use upfront costs and rates to extrapolate an "effective rate," the average movement has been 0.01-0.02% on any given day. Rates have been more likely to move lower vs higher in the past 6 days, but that creates some risks in and of itself. Market participants who trade the securities that underly mortgage rates tend to shy away from additional buying once these winning streaks get to be more than 7 days long. With all of the above in mind, our potential 7th winning day in a
Personal Debt Consolidation

Personal Debt Consolidation

The combining of several unsecured debts into a single, new loan that is more favorable. Debt consolidation involves taking out a new loan to pay off a number of other debts. The new loan may result in a lower interest rate, lower monthly payment or both. Consumers can use debt consolidation as a tool to make it easier to get out of student loan debt, credit card debt and other types of debt that aren't tied to an asset.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debt Consolidation'

There are several pitfalls consumers should consider when consolidating debt:

– Extending the loan term. Your monthly payment and interest rate might be lower, but you might pay more interest in the long run if you take longer to pay back what you owe.

– Continuing to spend beyond your means. Consolidating debt alone does not get you out of debt; improving spending and saving habits is key. Put your old credit cards in a drawer so you won't use them and don't apply for new ones to avoid getting back into debt.

– Using a home equity loan or line of credit to consolidate consumer debt. While these loans offer low interest rates and deductible interest for taxpayers who itemize their deductions, they also put your home at risk if you fail to make the required payments. Be very cautious about taking this route. It doesn't make sense to lose your house because you couldn't pay your credit card bills.

– Paying expensive fees to a debt-consolidation service. You can consolidate your debt yourself for free with a new loan or low-interest credit card.

– Consolidating debt for convenience. The simplicity of a single monthly payment is not a sufficient reason to consolidate debt.

DEFINITION of 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A loan that combines two or more federal education loans into a single loan. A Direct Consolidation Loan allows the borrower to make a single monthly payment. The loan is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Education and does not require borrowers to pay an application fee.

BREAKING DOWN 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A Direct Consolidation Loan allows borrowers to lower the number of loan payments they have to make each month, combining them into a single payment. Most federal loans are eligible for consolidation, but private loans are not eligible. Borrowers can consolidate once they complete school, leave school or fall below half-time student status.

Before considering a Direct Consolidation Loan, it is important to consider any benefits associated with the original loans, such as interest rate discounts and rebates. Once the loans are rolled into a new loan, those benefits are lost. Additionally, if the new loan increases the repayment period, the borrower may wind up paying more interest.

 

Privacy policy | Sitemap | Terms of use

© iWantaBetterMortgage.Com | Suite 261 631 N. Stephanie Street Henderson, NV 89014

Better Business Bureau