Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Mortgage Rates in Drift Mode
Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:00:02 GMT - Mortgage rates didn't do much today. The average lender was effectively unchanged from yesterday. The same could be said yesterday, and the day before that, and so on and so on... The only major adjustment to rates in recent weeks has been the abrupt spike of roughly 0.15% that occurred for some lenders when they re-implemented the new adverse market fee. Not sure what that is? Get caught up HERE . The adverse fee will continue working its way through the industry in the coming weeks. No lender is immune. This presents a great opportunity to lock refinance loans if you have one in process with a lender who has yet to bring the fee back. Once the fee is back in play for every lender, we could see rates relax just a little--at least enough to notice. The rationale is that there's currently a
Refresher on The New Refi Fee and Its Effect on Mortgage Rates
Tue, 22 Sep 2020 21:41:29 GMT - Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are the two government sponsored agencies that guarantee timely payment of principal and interest to the investors who front the money that finances the American mortgage market. This guarantee means that more investors are willing to participate and at more advantageous rates for homeowners. Naturally, not every mortgage is repaid perfectly. Sometimes, payments are missed. In more serious situations, loans can end in foreclosure, short sales, etc. In those cases, the housing agencies are there to act as a backstop ensuring investors are made whole. In order to foot that bill, Fannie and Freddie collect fees on loans that they guarantee. Shockingly, these are called guarantee fees (or guaranty fees" with a "Y" in the case of Fannie Mae). The mortgage industry and
Mortgage Rates Vary Widely--Nothing To Do With The Fed
Thu, 17 Sep 2020 21:15:17 GMT - Yesterday's policy announcement from the Federal Reserve had a chance to cause significant volatility for the bond market and the bond market is the chief ingredient in the mortgage rate equation. But this time around, the Fed didn't cause a measurable reaction in the mortgage market. I'm frequently asked whether mortgage rates are 0% since the Fed just kept rates at 0%. People hear a headline on the news or a radio soundbyte mentioning the words "Fed, rate, zero," and then assume the Fed just made some change that dropped rates to zero percent. After all why would there be so many news headlines about it if the Fed merely kept its policy rate unchanged?! It's a fair question in that sense, but understand that the Fed's rate decision will always make the news, even if the rate is the same as
Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

There are many different solutions available for various client profiles. Depending on what your employment type is, and how your credit looks, you may have different options available to you. For a profile analysis, you should contact I Want a Better Mortgage. From there, we can recommend some great options, tailored to your situation. Generally speaking, there are two types of mortgage terms. Open or closed. If you are unsure whether closed or open, fixed or variable is right for you. Read on, the info below will give you a better understanding. We are still just a phone call away in case you want to talk to a live mortgage professional about any of the options listed below.

Open vs. Closed

An open mortgage is 100% open for prepayment at any time throughout the term of the loan. This means that you have the option to repay any or all of the mortgage balance at any time without penalty. This type of mortgage may be important to you if you can foresee repaying your mortgage loan in the near term. For example, you may be planning to sell your home within the term of the mortgage and paying it out in full, or you may be expecting other money that will allow you to make large prepayments to mortgage loan. A closed mortgage has restrictions on how much of the principal you can repay without penalty within the term of the loan. Most closed mortgages will allow you to repay a certain portion of the principal amount every year without penalty. The amount you can prepay depends on the lending institution but usually ranges from 10% to 25% of the original principal amount per year. There may be restrictions on when these prepayments can occur and how many times per year you can make a prepayment. For example, you may be able to only make prepayments once throughout the year on the anniversary date of the mortgage or the prepayment may need to coincide with a payment date. Your mortgage professional will discuss these policies with you as each institutionšs policies can vary widely and it may be difficult to find a better mortgage.  iWantaBetterMortgage.Com is a great place to start.

Fixed Rate vs. Variable Rate

A fixed rate mortgage is where the interest rate is set at the time you get your mortgage loan and will not change for the entire term of the loan. For example, if you take out a 5-year term, fixed rate mortgage at 5.25%, you know that your rate is fixed at 5.25% for five years and will not change. This type of mortgage offers you security and peace of mind, as you know exactly what the interest rate and payments will be. You will generally pay a little higher interest rate for a fixed rate mortgage and the rate usually increases with the length of the term. A variable rate mortgage is a mortgage where the interest rate is tied to and floats with the bankšs prime rate. If the prime rate goes up, then your rate goes up. If the prime rate goes down, then your rate goes down. Variable rate mortgages usually offer the lowest available rate because you are taking the risk that rates may rise. There are many different options available for variable rate mortgages. Your mortgage professional will help you review all of your options to find the best mortgage available.

Mortgage Term

The term of the mortgage is the contractual life of your mortgage loan. The term represents the length of time that you and the financial institution are obligated to each other with respect to your mortgage. As you choose your mortgage, the term is one of the decisions you will need to make. The term of the mortgage is usually shorter than the actual life, or amortization of your mortgage. Once the term has expired, the mortgage is completely open for renegotiation. At that time, you have the right to find a new lender if you wish and your financial institution has the right to re-qualify you before renewing your mortgage. In practice, as long as your mortgage is current and all payments have been made as agreed, financial institutions will often automatically renew your mortgage, and not require that you re-qualify.

Payment Frequency

Most lenders allow several options for payment frequency (how often you make your mortgage payments). Most will allow you to make payments either weekly, bi-weekly (every two weeks), semi-monthly (twice a month) or monthly. Choosing which type of payment to make will be a matter of convenience, but there may be advantages to paying more frequently than monthly. When you increase the payment frequency, you reduce the principal faster, pay less interest and pay off the mortgage sooner. Contact us to discuss the options that will work best for you.

 

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