Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Lowest Rates in 8 Years, But All Kinds of Disclaimers
Thu, 27 Feb 2020 23:29:50 GMT - Mortgage rates hit the lowest levels in 8 years either today or yesterday, depending on the lender, just narrowly edging out the rates seen in early July 2016. There are multiple caveats, however. First off, lenders are responding to recent market movements in different ways. Some lenders move down faster and then remain flat even as the bond market (which dictates rates) improves. Other lenders have been slow to react, but have since moved down more steadily. Still others are somewhere between those extremes. Perhaps the most important thing to note about mortgage rates this week is that, while they are certainly at long-term lows, they are absolutely NOT moving lower as fast or as much as US Treasury yields. I discussed this in greater detail in the previous rate article and then again this
Important Lessons From Near-Record Low Mortgage Rates
Tue, 25 Feb 2020 01:24:08 GMT - Mortgage rates continue to carve out the unlikeliest of victories in 2020 with significant help from coronavirus. The epidemic has taken a year that was almost certain to start off with a steady move toward higher rates and turned it into one of the strongest starts on record. In fact, when it comes to the combination of ground covered and levels achieved, no other year has started off any better. Other years have seen a similarly big drop in rates during Jan/Feb, but there aren't many. Of those years, 2016 was the only one to remotely match the rates we're currently seeing. Unless tragedy strikes the mortgage world by the end of this week, 2020's late February rates will be roughly 0.25% lower than they were in 2016. But rates ultimately did move lower in 2016 after the Brexit vote in late
Mortgage Rates Back Near Multi-Year Lows
Thu, 20 Feb 2020 21:36:58 GMT - Mortgage rates haven't been this low for this long in years--3.5 years to be exact. Brexit was the talk of the town in the middle of 2016 and it resulted in rates very close to all-time lows for well over 3 months (all of July, Aug, Sept). Although rates aren't quite as low this time around, they average lender is still quoting 3.5% or lower on top tier scenarios. That's only happened on a consistent basis in 2016 and 2012. Moreover, the current stint is approaching a month in length. Combine that with the fact that rates haven't been over 3.875% since the middle of 2019, and the current mortgage environment is more than worthy of being viewed in the same legendary light as 2012 and 2016. In 2012 it was the European crisis and massive central bank bond buying. In 2016 it was Brexit and massive
Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

There are many different solutions available for various client profiles. Depending on what your employment type is, and how your credit looks, you may have different options available to you. For a profile analysis, you should contact I Want a Better Mortgage. From there, we can recommend some great options, tailored to your situation. Generally speaking, there are two types of mortgage terms. Open or closed. If you are unsure whether closed or open, fixed or variable is right for you. Read on, the info below will give you a better understanding. We are still just a phone call away in case you want to talk to a live mortgage professional about any of the options listed below.

Open vs. Closed

An open mortgage is 100% open for prepayment at any time throughout the term of the loan. This means that you have the option to repay any or all of the mortgage balance at any time without penalty. This type of mortgage may be important to you if you can foresee repaying your mortgage loan in the near term. For example, you may be planning to sell your home within the term of the mortgage and paying it out in full, or you may be expecting other money that will allow you to make large prepayments to mortgage loan. A closed mortgage has restrictions on how much of the principal you can repay without penalty within the term of the loan. Most closed mortgages will allow you to repay a certain portion of the principal amount every year without penalty. The amount you can prepay depends on the lending institution but usually ranges from 10% to 25% of the original principal amount per year. There may be restrictions on when these prepayments can occur and how many times per year you can make a prepayment. For example, you may be able to only make prepayments once throughout the year on the anniversary date of the mortgage or the prepayment may need to coincide with a payment date. Your mortgage professional will discuss these policies with you as each institutionšs policies can vary widely and it may be difficult to find a better mortgage.  iWantaBetterMortgage.Com is a great place to start.

Fixed Rate vs. Variable Rate

A fixed rate mortgage is where the interest rate is set at the time you get your mortgage loan and will not change for the entire term of the loan. For example, if you take out a 5-year term, fixed rate mortgage at 5.25%, you know that your rate is fixed at 5.25% for five years and will not change. This type of mortgage offers you security and peace of mind, as you know exactly what the interest rate and payments will be. You will generally pay a little higher interest rate for a fixed rate mortgage and the rate usually increases with the length of the term. A variable rate mortgage is a mortgage where the interest rate is tied to and floats with the bankšs prime rate. If the prime rate goes up, then your rate goes up. If the prime rate goes down, then your rate goes down. Variable rate mortgages usually offer the lowest available rate because you are taking the risk that rates may rise. There are many different options available for variable rate mortgages. Your mortgage professional will help you review all of your options to find the best mortgage available.

Mortgage Term

The term of the mortgage is the contractual life of your mortgage loan. The term represents the length of time that you and the financial institution are obligated to each other with respect to your mortgage. As you choose your mortgage, the term is one of the decisions you will need to make. The term of the mortgage is usually shorter than the actual life, or amortization of your mortgage. Once the term has expired, the mortgage is completely open for renegotiation. At that time, you have the right to find a new lender if you wish and your financial institution has the right to re-qualify you before renewing your mortgage. In practice, as long as your mortgage is current and all payments have been made as agreed, financial institutions will often automatically renew your mortgage, and not require that you re-qualify.

Payment Frequency

Most lenders allow several options for payment frequency (how often you make your mortgage payments). Most will allow you to make payments either weekly, bi-weekly (every two weeks), semi-monthly (twice a month) or monthly. Choosing which type of payment to make will be a matter of convenience, but there may be advantages to paying more frequently than monthly. When you increase the payment frequency, you reduce the principal faster, pay less interest and pay off the mortgage sooner. Contact us to discuss the options that will work best for you.

 

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