Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

The Real Story Behind The Past 2 Weeks of Mortgage Rate Volatility
Fri, 15 Jan 2021 21:44:38 GMT - It was easy to get lulled into complacency by the second half of 2020 when it came to mortgage rates. Even as other indicators said rates should be rising, they continued on a calm journey to multiple record lows. 2021 has been very different so far! Covid and its impacts on the economy remain the driving forces behind market trends. That's generally been great for rates, but it also means that rates should gradually rise as we battle back against covid. If the onset of the pandemic pushed rates to all-time lows, it's only fair that progress against the pandemic would result in rates moving up from all-time lows. If you ask 10yr Treasury yields, that's been the case for quite a while. And while the stock market has been singing a similar tune, the mortgage market has been in its own glorious
Mortgage Rates Continue Healing, But Remain Well Above Recent Lows
Wed, 13 Jan 2021 21:50:22 GMT - Mortgage rates had another solid day today--this time without any of the early drama seen yesterday. If you're just getting caught up, the bond market (which drives day-to-day interest rate movement) has been selling off aggressively since the Jan 5th Georgia senate election. When bonds sell-off, it means bond PRICES are getting lower and bond YIELDS (aka RATES) are getting higher. The GA election sparked the move because it gave democrats total control of the government, thus making it easier to pass legislation--especially as it concerns some sort of upgrade to the most recent round of covid-relief stimulus. Covid-relief stimulus may do great things for people in the short term and for the economy in the longer term, but it does bad things for interest rates (assuming you like low rates,
Mortgage Rates Find Some Support After an Ugly Start
Tue, 12 Jan 2021 21:45:45 GMT - Mortgage rates were off to a very bad start this morning, but recovered a portion of what they lost by the end of the day. The specifics depend greatly on the lender in question. Sadly, few if any lenders are still able to offer the rates seen yesterday. To make matters worse, yesterday's rates were already significantly higher than those seen just one week prior. But how about a big silver lining? One week prior to yesterday, the average lender was offering all-time low mortgage rates. So being "significantly higher" than that still hasn't been enough to move the average top tier conventional 30yr fixed quote up to 3%. Before covid, 3.125% was the lowest ever 30yr fixed rate! If you're in the purchase market, 2.75% is still common (2.875% for refis). Lenders continue to be widely stratified
Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

There are many different solutions available for various client profiles. Depending on what your employment type is, and how your credit looks, you may have different options available to you. For a profile analysis, you should contact I Want a Better Mortgage. From there, we can recommend some great options, tailored to your situation. Generally speaking, there are two types of mortgage terms. Open or closed. If you are unsure whether closed or open, fixed or variable is right for you. Read on, the info below will give you a better understanding. We are still just a phone call away in case you want to talk to a live mortgage professional about any of the options listed below.

Open vs. Closed

An open mortgage is 100% open for prepayment at any time throughout the term of the loan. This means that you have the option to repay any or all of the mortgage balance at any time without penalty. This type of mortgage may be important to you if you can foresee repaying your mortgage loan in the near term. For example, you may be planning to sell your home within the term of the mortgage and paying it out in full, or you may be expecting other money that will allow you to make large prepayments to mortgage loan. A closed mortgage has restrictions on how much of the principal you can repay without penalty within the term of the loan. Most closed mortgages will allow you to repay a certain portion of the principal amount every year without penalty. The amount you can prepay depends on the lending institution but usually ranges from 10% to 25% of the original principal amount per year. There may be restrictions on when these prepayments can occur and how many times per year you can make a prepayment. For example, you may be able to only make prepayments once throughout the year on the anniversary date of the mortgage or the prepayment may need to coincide with a payment date. Your mortgage professional will discuss these policies with you as each institutionšs policies can vary widely and it may be difficult to find a better mortgage.  iWantaBetterMortgage.Com is a great place to start.

Fixed Rate vs. Variable Rate

A fixed rate mortgage is where the interest rate is set at the time you get your mortgage loan and will not change for the entire term of the loan. For example, if you take out a 5-year term, fixed rate mortgage at 5.25%, you know that your rate is fixed at 5.25% for five years and will not change. This type of mortgage offers you security and peace of mind, as you know exactly what the interest rate and payments will be. You will generally pay a little higher interest rate for a fixed rate mortgage and the rate usually increases with the length of the term. A variable rate mortgage is a mortgage where the interest rate is tied to and floats with the bankšs prime rate. If the prime rate goes up, then your rate goes up. If the prime rate goes down, then your rate goes down. Variable rate mortgages usually offer the lowest available rate because you are taking the risk that rates may rise. There are many different options available for variable rate mortgages. Your mortgage professional will help you review all of your options to find the best mortgage available.

Mortgage Term

The term of the mortgage is the contractual life of your mortgage loan. The term represents the length of time that you and the financial institution are obligated to each other with respect to your mortgage. As you choose your mortgage, the term is one of the decisions you will need to make. The term of the mortgage is usually shorter than the actual life, or amortization of your mortgage. Once the term has expired, the mortgage is completely open for renegotiation. At that time, you have the right to find a new lender if you wish and your financial institution has the right to re-qualify you before renewing your mortgage. In practice, as long as your mortgage is current and all payments have been made as agreed, financial institutions will often automatically renew your mortgage, and not require that you re-qualify.

Payment Frequency

Most lenders allow several options for payment frequency (how often you make your mortgage payments). Most will allow you to make payments either weekly, bi-weekly (every two weeks), semi-monthly (twice a month) or monthly. Choosing which type of payment to make will be a matter of convenience, but there may be advantages to paying more frequently than monthly. When you increase the payment frequency, you reduce the principal faster, pay less interest and pay off the mortgage sooner. Contact us to discuss the options that will work best for you.

 

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