Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Who's Lying About The Spike in Mortgage Rates?
Fri, 24 Sep 2021 23:46:51 GMT - As recently as Thursday, news outlets were reporting mortgage rates had only risen modestly this week with 30yr fixed rates still well under 3.00%. In fact, they were already well over 3.00% by then. So who's lying to you? Perhaps no one! Thursday's news fell victim to the oldest trick in the mortgage rate reporting book. Well, it's not a trick so much as a pitfall , but it's surprisingly common given how easy it would be to avoid. The issue centers on Freddie Mac's weekly mortgage rate survey. As the name suggests, this is an actual survey that's sent out to thousands of originators over the weekend. Responses are accepted through Wednesday, but a majority of responses are in by Monday morning. Results aren't released until Thursday. This isn't a problem when rates remain relatively flat between
Mortgage Rates Are Actually MUCH Higher This Week
Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:47:38 GMT - Mortgage rates jumped substantially higher today as global markets reacted to yesterday's Fed announcement. But that's really just scratching the surface. The Fed is a convenient talking point because simply due to timing and the absence of another obvious, singular source of inspiration. It's entirely possible that the confluence of other factors would be producing a similar result regardless of the Fed. In fact, the bond market is talking about 8-9 separate potential market movers today. Most of them are fairly esoteric. The Fed's decision to telegraph a tapering announcement in November is one of the simplest topics, but simpler still is the week-over-week drop in covid case counts in the US. Late September was always going to be important in that regard for several reasons. It's late enough
Epic Fed Needle Threading Leaves Rates Relatively Unchanged
Wed, 22 Sep 2021 21:47:34 GMT - Mortgage rates were surprisingly steady today as the bond market reacted to a new policy announcement from the Fed. Perhaps "reacted" is the wrong word considering the market's response. Specifically, the bond market (which dictates interest rates on mortgages and beyond) was hard to distinguish from most any other random trading day. That's nothing short of impressive given what transpired. So what transpired? That requires a bit of background, but let's make it quick. The Fed is currently buying $120 bln / month in new Treasuries and MBS. These purchases greatly contribute to the low rate environment for mortgages. The Fed has done this, off and on in the past since 2009. 2013 was the first major example of the Fed "tapering" its monthly bond purchases after an extended period of accommodation
Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

There are many different solutions available for various client profiles. Depending on what your employment type is, and how your credit looks, you may have different options available to you. For a profile analysis, you should contact I Want a Better Mortgage. From there, we can recommend some great options, tailored to your situation. Generally speaking, there are two types of mortgage terms. Open or closed. If you are unsure whether closed or open, fixed or variable is right for you. Read on, the info below will give you a better understanding. We are still just a phone call away in case you want to talk to a live mortgage professional about any of the options listed below.

Open vs. Closed

An open mortgage is 100% open for prepayment at any time throughout the term of the loan. This means that you have the option to repay any or all of the mortgage balance at any time without penalty. This type of mortgage may be important to you if you can foresee repaying your mortgage loan in the near term. For example, you may be planning to sell your home within the term of the mortgage and paying it out in full, or you may be expecting other money that will allow you to make large prepayments to mortgage loan. A closed mortgage has restrictions on how much of the principal you can repay without penalty within the term of the loan. Most closed mortgages will allow you to repay a certain portion of the principal amount every year without penalty. The amount you can prepay depends on the lending institution but usually ranges from 10% to 25% of the original principal amount per year. There may be restrictions on when these prepayments can occur and how many times per year you can make a prepayment. For example, you may be able to only make prepayments once throughout the year on the anniversary date of the mortgage or the prepayment may need to coincide with a payment date. Your mortgage professional will discuss these policies with you as each institutionšs policies can vary widely and it may be difficult to find a better mortgage.  iWantaBetterMortgage.Com is a great place to start.

Fixed Rate vs. Variable Rate

A fixed rate mortgage is where the interest rate is set at the time you get your mortgage loan and will not change for the entire term of the loan. For example, if you take out a 5-year term, fixed rate mortgage at 5.25%, you know that your rate is fixed at 5.25% for five years and will not change. This type of mortgage offers you security and peace of mind, as you know exactly what the interest rate and payments will be. You will generally pay a little higher interest rate for a fixed rate mortgage and the rate usually increases with the length of the term. A variable rate mortgage is a mortgage where the interest rate is tied to and floats with the bankšs prime rate. If the prime rate goes up, then your rate goes up. If the prime rate goes down, then your rate goes down. Variable rate mortgages usually offer the lowest available rate because you are taking the risk that rates may rise. There are many different options available for variable rate mortgages. Your mortgage professional will help you review all of your options to find the best mortgage available.

Mortgage Term

The term of the mortgage is the contractual life of your mortgage loan. The term represents the length of time that you and the financial institution are obligated to each other with respect to your mortgage. As you choose your mortgage, the term is one of the decisions you will need to make. The term of the mortgage is usually shorter than the actual life, or amortization of your mortgage. Once the term has expired, the mortgage is completely open for renegotiation. At that time, you have the right to find a new lender if you wish and your financial institution has the right to re-qualify you before renewing your mortgage. In practice, as long as your mortgage is current and all payments have been made as agreed, financial institutions will often automatically renew your mortgage, and not require that you re-qualify.

Payment Frequency

Most lenders allow several options for payment frequency (how often you make your mortgage payments). Most will allow you to make payments either weekly, bi-weekly (every two weeks), semi-monthly (twice a month) or monthly. Choosing which type of payment to make will be a matter of convenience, but there may be advantages to paying more frequently than monthly. When you increase the payment frequency, you reduce the principal faster, pay less interest and pay off the mortgage sooner. Contact us to discuss the options that will work best for you.

 

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