Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Mortgage Rates Continue Defying Bond Market Weakness
Wed, 02 Dec 2020 21:33:19 GMT - Although it was the focus of yesterday's discussion , the ability of the mortgage market to hold steady in the face of bond market weakness continues to impress . This is interesting because mortgage rates take direct cues from the bond market. That's still the case, but at the moment, the mortgage side of the bond market is playing with a stacked deck . If Treasuries are only a little bit weaker on any given day (like today), mortgage bonds and mortgage rates have been consistently holding their ground or actually improving. Today was more of a "ground-holding" sort of day, but it depends on how any given lender responded to yesterday's bond market weakness. Those who adjusted rates higher yesterday were generally in slightly better shape today . Those who abstained yesterday were offering
Mortgage Rates Surprisingly Steady Despite Market Drama
Tue, 01 Dec 2020 21:39:03 GMT - Like many industries, housing finance has a superficial layer that's fairly easy to understand for the average consumer. A person wants a home. They don't want to pay cash. They get a loan. Lower rates = lower payments. The end. Shortly below that superficial layer of understanding, where a surprisingly high percentage of mortgage professionals operate, it's popular to discuss 10yr Treasury yields as a basis for mortgage rates. The only problem with viewing 10yr yields as the basis for mortgage rates is that they're not. Anyone can observe this objective fact by jumping just a bit deeper into the rabbit hole and acquainting themselves with MBS (mortgage-backed securities). These are the true raw ingredients for mortgage rates even though they frequently mimic 10yr Treasury yield movement. By
Mortgage Rates Hold Steady Over Holiday Weekend
Mon, 30 Nov 2020 22:09:53 GMT - Although many mortgage lenders were technically open for business last Friday, it's a well-known unofficial holiday. Mortgage rate movement requires bond market movement, and the post-Thanksgiving Friday invariably sees fewer traders trading fewer bonds. Even when bonds do manage to move, the people in charge of setting mortgage rates at various lending institutions tend to play it safe. In fact, many lenders simply leave rates wherever they were on Wednesday and then simply plan on getting back to work on Monday. This particular Monday, however, the average lender is still in line with Friday's and Wednesday's rates. Some of them offered lower rates in response to strength in the bond market today. Those who abstained are expected to offer token improvements tomorrow, assuming the bond market
Mortgage Rates Little-Changed But The Fed Raises Some Doubts
Wed, 25 Nov 2020 21:36:15 GMT - Mortgage rates have been operating relatively close to their all-time lows recently and today was no exception. The Fed raised some doubts as to how much longer that would be the case this afternoon when it released the minutes of its most recent policy meeting (from 3 weeks ago). The Fed questioned whether its mortgage-specific bond buying was having any ill effects. That's only a vague hint of a threat, to be fair, but on top of that, market participants also felt the Fed did less than expected to telegraph any enhancement of its bond buying plans (something that traders saw as a stronger possibility for the upcoming Fed announcement in mid-December). The market reaction was almost negligible in the bigger picture, but it looks like it would give a modest bump to rates if markets had more
How The New Loan Limits Affect Mortgage Rates
Tue, 24 Nov 2020 21:58:55 GMT - If you follow the MBS Commentary channel on this site, you will have already seen most of the following, but it's relevant for consumers as well. As far as mortgage rates are concerned, the increase in conforming loan limits doesn't have a direct impact, but it does change rate availability for those seeking certain loan amounts. There's a link below where you can see exactly what the new loan limit is for any given county. If you'd like to read the official FHFA press release, here you go , but here's the skinny on the new conforming loan limit of $548,250 for 2021, up from $510,400 in 2020. Which loans does this apply to? Conventional, conforming loans (those sold to or securitized by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which is a vast majority of the market), both refinances and purchases Does this
Private Mortgages

Private Mortgages

5 tips for doing a private mortgage

It's tough to find certificates of deposit that pay 2% a year. But if you're a bank lending to 30-year fixed-rate mortgage borrowers, you can earn 4%. At I Want a Better Mortgage, our specialists can help cut through the red tape and help you succeed in getting the loan you want.

Wouldn't it be great to be a bank?

Pros and cons

When Pittsburgh accountant and attorney James Lange bought his mother's house, he paid her half the purchase price over time, using what's often called a family or private mortgage. The transaction, he says, "worked out beautifully."

Yet he sounds a note of caution. "With this one, I've seen more problems than good situations," Mr. Lange warns. "If it's a choice between making a car payment and paying Dad, the kid will make the car payment, because Dad isn't going to foreclose."

Failing to pay is clearly the biggest potential problem—and it could have financial reverberations. If the child miss's payments, the parents will likely want to make it up to their other children, either by making gifts or adjusting their estate plan.

Even if the child pays on time, the deal may create family tension, perhaps because the parents start questioning the child's financial decisions or because the child fears their disapproval. On top of this, the child's regular mortgage payments won't help his or her credit score. To set up the private mortgage, you may need legal help—and the attorney involved could charge a hefty sum, given that this isn't your typical real-estate deal.

Set against these pitfalls are some key advantages. "It saves on closing costs and private mortgage insurance," notes Allan Roth, a financial planner in Colorado Springs, Colo. "I've set it up as a win-win, where the kid gets a low-cost mortgage and the parents get cash flow. But I've also done it as a wealth transfer, so you charge the lowest interest rate the government allows."

Five Tips

I have mentioned the notion of private mortgages to many folks, and the reactions are all over the place. Some think it's financially foolish. Others find the idea clever. Are you among those who are intrigued? Here are five tips:

You have to charge interest

To avoid tax headaches, you need to collect at least a minimum amount of interest, which is the IRS's "applicable federal rate."

You'll need a promissory note

This spells out the terms of the mortgage, including the interest rate and the repayment period.

You'll need a deed of trust

Also known as a mortgage or security deed, this establishes that the loan is secured by the property and the lender has the right to take the property back, should the borrower fail to pay. For your son or daughter to deduct the loan's interest payments, the deed of trust needs to be recorded with the appropriate local authority.

All this might sound complicated, but there's a four-year-old firm, National Family Mortgage, that will do the necessary paperwork for $725. The Waltham, Mass., company will also oversee payments for a fee of $15 a month and up, including providing monthly statements and annual tax reporting. "For a lot of families, it's all about keeping this relationship as business-like as possible," says National Family Mortgage's chief executive, Timothy Burke.

Get title insurance

Your child should talk to his or her attorney about getting title insurance, but you might save money by not bothering with a separate lender's policy, Mr. Burke says.

Think through the risks involved

As a rule, if your child couldn't qualify for a mortgage from a bank, you probably shouldn't be lending, either. Sure, there may be circumstances that you know about that perhaps a bank would be reluctant to consider. For instance, maybe your daughter is about to graduate and start a well-paying job.

You also shouldn't write a private mortgage if you can't afford to lose the money involved.

Pros and cons of private-mortgage loans

The problem for most borrowers in recent years hasn't been low mortgage rates, it has been the strict lending requirements imposed by most lenders. If you're having trouble qualifying for a conventional mortgage, a private-mortgage lender may be an option.

Private money funds, also known as "hard money," usually come from private investors or private lending companies who are willing to loan homebuyers money to purchase a specific property.

Homebuyers can often find these lenders by joining a real estate investment club in their area, Martin says, but these loans are most often secured by home investors. Unfortunately, not every homeowner will be successful getting money from a private lender.

Here are the pros and cons regarding private mortgage loans:

Pro: Easy to qualify

The loans could be a great option for homebuyers who are not able to qualify for a traditional mortgage because of less-than-perfect credit, debt or for self-employed individuals who can't always provide proof of a steady income.

The underwriting of the hard money loan is not so 'person' focused as it is 'property' focused. A person with poor credit can get a hard money loan if the project shows a likely profit."

Con: Short payback period

Private loans aren't paid back over 30 years like a traditional mortgage. Many private-money lenders expect the loan to be repaid within an extremely short time period, such as six to 12 months

Private lenders are often looking for a quick return for their money, and they usually aren't set up to service a loan for several years the way a typical mortgage company is.

For this reason alone, most homebuyers should look elsewhere for mortgages.

Pro: Great for 'flippers'

However, you might consider such a short repayment period if you plan to sell or "flip" the house within that timeframe, or expect to be able to qualify for a conventional refinance within a few months after acquiring the property.

If you plan to make extensive renovations in a short time period that will boost the value of the home, it is possible that you could sell or refinance the property fairly quickly.

Pro: Geared toward 'fixer-upper' properties

Homes that need extensive renovations generally can't qualify for conventional mortgages, no matter how good the borrower's credit is. In those cases, private money can play an important role, he says.

Some vacant homes may have been vandalized or someone may have stolen the plumbing. A private lender could step in and provide financing to get the house in sellable condition, and then "flip" the house.

Con: High interest rates

Interest rates are much higher with private-money lending than with conventional loans, Curtis says. In fact, mortgage rates are sometimes more than double typical 30-year mortgage rates, often 12 to 20 percent per year, he says.

Mortgage rates are so high because private lenders don't usually require perfect credit. Loans from private lenders are generally secured by the property in question, so it's usually not as important to the lender if the borrower has pristine credit.

Pro: Short approval process

If you have a house that you believe is a candidate for a private loan, the approval process often takes just a couple of weeks, as opposed to 30 to 45 days for a conventional loan.

For many borrowers, getting a loan that quick is a good tradeoff for higher interest rates. Private money lenders don't require a long drawn-out loan process like a conventional mortgage does.

If you have a house you want to rehab, and you feel that you could improve it enough to boost its worth in a short period of time that would allow you to pay off a private loan and replace it with a conventional refinance or sale, then getting a private loan is a viable option.

As long as you understand the caveats and do your research, it is possible to successfully secure a property without a conventional loan.

Having problems securing a mortgage? You're not alone. There are many reasons why someone may fall outside of the borrowing guidelines of institutional lenders. At iWantaBetterMortgage, we can help find the right lender for you.

Whether you have less than perfect credit, a reduced income, or a life event that has impacted your current financial situation, a private mortgage may be an option for you.

We'll sit down with you and discuss your current situation, and we'll look into financing options that may be suited to your needs.  Star your search at I Want a Better Mortgage.

 

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