Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Mortgage Rates Nominally Higher Despite Bond Market Warning
Fri, 18 Jan 2019 21:10:54 GMT - Mortgage rates rose gently today. Most mortgage borrowers (and many mortgage professionals, for that matter) wouldn't be aware of slightly more alarming risks lurking underneath the surface. Those risks involve the broader bond market from which mortgage-related bonds take their directional cues. More simply put, if US Treasuries are improving, mortgage-backed bonds tend to improve as well. The level of correlation varies though. For nearly all of 2018, mortgages weren't improving as quickly as the most widely-used rate benchmark: 10yr Treasury yields. That began to change recently--especially when 10yr yields began moving higher 3 weeks ago. During that time, we've seen moderate moves higher in 10yr yields met with modest moves higher in mortgage rates. Today was another one of those days
Mortgage Rates Holding Ground But Volatility Could Increase
Thu, 17 Jan 2019 21:03:34 GMT - Mortgage rates were technically steady today. In fact, as of this writing, most lenders are offering slightly better terms compared to yesterday, but only by barely-detectable amounts. The afternoon brought volatility in financial markets owing to trade-related headline. That volatility isn't moving in a good direction for mortgage rates at the moment. The takeaway is that, all other things being equal, lenders will be offering slightly weaker terms tomorrow morning, assuming they don't see quite enough weakness to adjust today's offerings with only a few hours left in the day. Combine the volatility risk with the fact that rates are still very close to their lowest levels since last April, and this is still a compelling opportunity for potential homebuyers or owners interested in refinancing
Personal Debt Consolidation

Personal Debt Consolidation

The combining of several unsecured debts into a single, new loan that is more favorable. Debt consolidation involves taking out a new loan to pay off a number of other debts. The new loan may result in a lower interest rate, lower monthly payment or both. Consumers can use debt consolidation as a tool to make it easier to get out of student loan debt, credit card debt and other types of debt that aren't tied to an asset.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debt Consolidation'

There are several pitfalls consumers should consider when consolidating debt:

– Extending the loan term. Your monthly payment and interest rate might be lower, but you might pay more interest in the long run if you take longer to pay back what you owe.

– Continuing to spend beyond your means. Consolidating debt alone does not get you out of debt; improving spending and saving habits is key. Put your old credit cards in a drawer so you won't use them and don't apply for new ones to avoid getting back into debt.

– Using a home equity loan or line of credit to consolidate consumer debt. While these loans offer low interest rates and deductible interest for taxpayers who itemize their deductions, they also put your home at risk if you fail to make the required payments. Be very cautious about taking this route. It doesn't make sense to lose your house because you couldn't pay your credit card bills.

– Paying expensive fees to a debt-consolidation service. You can consolidate your debt yourself for free with a new loan or low-interest credit card.

– Consolidating debt for convenience. The simplicity of a single monthly payment is not a sufficient reason to consolidate debt.

DEFINITION of 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A loan that combines two or more federal education loans into a single loan. A Direct Consolidation Loan allows the borrower to make a single monthly payment. The loan is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Education and does not require borrowers to pay an application fee.

BREAKING DOWN 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A Direct Consolidation Loan allows borrowers to lower the number of loan payments they have to make each month, combining them into a single payment. Most federal loans are eligible for consolidation, but private loans are not eligible. Borrowers can consolidate once they complete school, leave school or fall below half-time student status.

Before considering a Direct Consolidation Loan, it is important to consider any benefits associated with the original loans, such as interest rate discounts and rebates. Once the loans are rolled into a new loan, those benefits are lost. Additionally, if the new loan increases the repayment period, the borrower may wind up paying more interest.

 

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