Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/reports/mortgage_rates/archive

Rates Begin Week Unchanged at July's Lows
Mon, 24 Jul 2017 21:18:02 GMT - Mortgage rates held steady today, which leaves them in line with the lowest levels in July. In underlying bond markets (bond movement directly impacts lenders' rate offerings), it was an exceptionally quiet day--especially for mortgage-related bonds. Activity should increase somewhat as the week progresses. That's a typical pattern for most weeks--all other things being equal (Mondays and Fridays tend to be slower)--but we'll also get events that tend to draw out more participation among traders. The most obvious calendar item is the Fed Announcement on Wednesday. Keep in mind, there are two different varieties of Fed Announcements. Of the 8 announcements each year, 4 of them are accompanied by a press conference with the Fed Chair, as well as economic projections. Whether by design or otherwise
Mortgage Rates Lowest in July
Fri, 21 Jul 2017 22:09:10 GMT - Mortgage rates moved lower today, setting yet another new low for the month of July. For the past 2 weeks, rates have been pushing back against a fairly abrupt spike that took place heading into the month. Concerns over the European Central Bank's (ECB's) bond buying plans sparked the move higher, but those concerns were officially put to rest as of yesterday. In simpler terms, extra demand for bonds pushes bond prices higher and rates lower. The ECB buys LOTS of bonds. This puts downward pressure on rates around the world (more so in Europe than in the US, but we still get some indirect benefit). There was some concern at the end of June that the ECB was getting closer to announcing it would buy fewer bonds (thus the rate spike heading into July). While that day will likely come eventually
Personal Debt Consolidation

Personal Debt Consolidation

The combining of several unsecured debts into a single, new loan that is more favorable. Debt consolidation involves taking out a new loan to pay off a number of other debts. The new loan may result in a lower interest rate, lower monthly payment or both. Consumers can use debt consolidation as a tool to make it easier to get out of student loan debt, credit card debt and other types of debt that aren't tied to an asset.

BREAKING DOWN 'Debt Consolidation'

There are several pitfalls consumers should consider when consolidating debt:

– Extending the loan term. Your monthly payment and interest rate might be lower, but you might pay more interest in the long run if you take longer to pay back what you owe.

– Continuing to spend beyond your means. Consolidating debt alone does not get you out of debt; improving spending and saving habits is key. Put your old credit cards in a drawer so you won't use them and don't apply for new ones to avoid getting back into debt.

– Using a home equity loan or line of credit to consolidate consumer debt. While these loans offer low interest rates and deductible interest for taxpayers who itemize their deductions, they also put your home at risk if you fail to make the required payments. Be very cautious about taking this route. It doesn't make sense to lose your house because you couldn't pay your credit card bills.

– Paying expensive fees to a debt-consolidation service. You can consolidate your debt yourself for free with a new loan or low-interest credit card.

– Consolidating debt for convenience. The simplicity of a single monthly payment is not a sufficient reason to consolidate debt.

DEFINITION of 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A loan that combines two or more federal education loans into a single loan. A Direct Consolidation Loan allows the borrower to make a single monthly payment. The loan is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Education and does not require borrowers to pay an application fee.

BREAKING DOWN 'Direct Consolidation Loan'

A Direct Consolidation Loan allows borrowers to lower the number of loan payments they have to make each month, combining them into a single payment. Most federal loans are eligible for consolidation, but private loans are not eligible. Borrowers can consolidate once they complete school, leave school or fall below half-time student status.

Before considering a Direct Consolidation Loan, it is important to consider any benefits associated with the original loans, such as interest rate discounts and rebates. Once the loans are rolled into a new loan, those benefits are lost. Additionally, if the new loan increases the repayment period, the borrower may wind up paying more interest.

 

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