Mortgage Rate Watch

Provided courtesy of: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/consumer_rates/

Rates Show Resilience But Not Without Help
Fri, 22 Sep 2017 20:27:00 GMT -

Mortgage rates held their ground yesterday.  That was a refreshing development given the abrupt move higher over the past 2 weeks and a relatively threatening reaction to Wednesday's Federal Reserve events.  Now again today, rates have managed to hold their ground.  In some cases, lenders improved by token amounts.  If yesterday was refreshing, today would be doubly so.

But the refreshment comes with caveats.  We don't really know what the natural direction would have been for rates today because underlying markets were clearly affected by overnight headlines regarding North Korea potentially testing an ICBM with a Hydrogen warhead in the Pacific Ocean.  In general, these sorts of headlines lead investors to shed risk--something that frequently takes the form of selling stocks and buying bonds.  When investors buy bonds, rates move lower.

...(read more)

Forward this article via email:  Send a copy of this story to someone you know that may want to read it.

Mortgage Rates Find Some Support
Thu, 21 Sep 2017 19:44:00 GMT -

Mortgage rates have been higher almost exclusively for the past 2 weeks.  Yesterday was no exception as the Federal Reserve released a rate hike forecast that was slightly more optimistic than markets were expecting.  By yesterday afternoon, the average 30yr fixed mortgage rate was at its highest levels in over a month.  

The Fed news justified a defensive stance among prospective mortgage borrowers.  When rates move initially higher following a Fed announcement, it's all too common to see that momentum continue in the following day.  In today's case, we've actually seen a bit of support.  Underlying bond markets were in slightly better shape vs yesterday for most of the day, thus allowing lenders to either keep mortgage rates unchanged or to bring them marginally lower.

...(read more)

Forward this article via email:  Send a copy of this story to someone you know that may want to read it.

Mortgage Rates Highest in More Than a Month After Fed
Wed, 20 Sep 2017 21:12:00 GMT -

Mortgage rates rose today following the announcement and--more importantly--the Fed's updated economic projections.  The Fed holds 8 meetings a year.  They release an official policy announcement after all of those.  Four of the meetings are "special" and are followed not only by a policy announcement, but also by updated economic projections from Fed members.  These projections include an important "dot plot" of the Fed's rate hike expectations.

The so-called dots have been more important than the actual announcement on some occasions.  While most of today's press coverage will focus on the fact that the Fed finally enacted its plan to shrink its balance sheet.  That was widely expected, however.

...(read more)

Forward this article via email:  Send a copy of this story to someone you know that may want to read it.

Buying an Investment Property

Buying an Investment Property

Don't Buy Your First Investment Property Until You Read This

Are you thinking of buying a rental property as part of your investment strategy? Here are a few things you need to think about.

Real estate can be an excellent part of anyone's investment strategy. However, before you buy your first house, condo, duplex, or apartment building to rent out, you need to have a good idea of what you're getting into.

Here are three things to be aware of before jumping into real estate investing -- and an alternative investment you could use instead.

The income can be inconsistent
When you buy just one investment property, you are effectively putting all of your eggs in one basket, just as if your entire portfolio consisted of stock in one company.

While owning an investment property can certainly be lucrative, it leaves you vulnerable to certain risks.

For example, if you buy a $100,000 investment property, you should be able to earn $1,000 in rental income per month, based on the general rule that properties should rent for about 1% of their value. However, what if you need several months to find your first tenant? Or what if your tenants stop paying rent and you have to evict them (which could take quite a while)?

If such a situation occurs, not only will your investment produce no cash flow, but you're still stuck paying for things like the mortgage, property taxes, insurance, and maintenance.

Do you really want to deal with tenants and maintenance?
The first mistake I made when I bought a rental property was underestimating how much work can be involved in dealing with tenants.

Finding quality tenants can be a challenge in itself, but the real issues tend to come up after they move in. For example, if your tenant is late on rent, do you really want to chase people down to find out what's going on? Do you have the first clue of what to do if you need to evict a tenant? And what if they are making too much noise, letting other people live there, or are violating any other part of the rental agreement?

Don't forget about maintenance and repairs. If you manage your rental property, be prepared for the phone to ring in the middle of the night if the tenants have a plumbing issue.

If you don't want to handle these situations, the alternative is to hire a property manager. This should cost you about 10% of the rental income you bring in. This can be well worth it, but it will cause your profits to take a serious hit.

Make sure that you account for "all" the costs
Speaking of the cost of a property manager, you might be surprised at how much it really costs to own a rental property.

In the example cited earlier involving a $100,000 rental property, let's say you put 20% down on the house and collect $1,000 in monthly rent. By financing the other $80,000, you can expect your monthly mortgage payments to be about $392 at today's rates, which might sound like an incredible profit margin. However, when figuring out the cash flow of your investment property, make sure to account for property taxes, insurance, maintenance costs, and property management.

These costs will vary based on your location and the condition of the property, but could easily add $500 or more to your monthly expenses. Also, bear in mind that many jurisdictions charge much higher property tax rates on investment properties, so make sure you take this into account as well.

Know what you're getting into
I'm not trying to talk you out of buying an investment property. In fact, if you do it right, buying an investment property can produce cash flow and build equity, creating wealth over time without a huge initial investment.

However, just like with any other investment, you need to make sure you know exactly what you're getting into and prepare for all the costs and the risks involved. If these seem like too much trouble, there is no shame in looking into alternatives, such as real estate investment trusts.

Buying an investment property can be a great opportunity.

Whether it be a house, cottage, farm, condo, or plot of land, buying real estate is traditionally a sound and profitable investment, offering both rental income and capital gains. The most obvious advantage of buying any income property is having other people pay off the debt on your investment property. And with interest rates low, there's no time like the present to jump in.

To buy an investment property you will need sound financing information and flexible loan options. When choosing a lender, loan rates are not always the most important. Because investment property mortgages are subject to specific governmental requirements, mortgages are constantly changing. It's a good idea to consult with a mortgage specialist at i Want a Better Mortgage who can bring experience and training to the table, helping you make an informed decision about your investment property mortgage options.

 

Privacy policy | Sitemap | Terms of use

© iWantaBetterMortgage.Com | 3606 Enterprise Avenue Suite 329 Naples, FL 34104

Better Business Bureau